Tag Archives: Akon

11 Years Ago Today, September 11-Curtis born!

The Queens rapper still pushing repetitive nihilism and G-Unit production styles instead of branching out and taking chances with his music.
50 Cent is a noted disciple of self-help guru Robert Greene’s Machiavellian handbook, The 48 Laws of Power. Not only has the muscle-bound hip-hop colossus modeled his career after the cutthroat guide, he’s working with Greene on a street-flavored addendum called The 50th Law. So far, the four dozen over-the-top credos have worked swimmingly for 50: He’s sold more than 20 million albums worldwide since 2003 while pulling in auxiliary profits with Vitamin Water and other less amusing side hustles.


50’s Hybrid

50 CENT TO RELEASE GREATEST HITS ALBUM ‘BEST OF 50 CENT’

50 Cent is looking back on his storied career with his first-ever greatest hits compilation, Best of 50 Cent.

Arriving 14 years after his breakout debut, Get Rich or Die Tryin’, the album will feature songs from the multiplatinum effort, as well as Fif’s other acclaimed projects, including The Massacre, Curtis, Before I Self Destruct, and the soundtrack for his Get Rich or Die Tryin’ movie.

The 18-track collection includes Get Rich hits like “In Da Club,” “21 Questions,” and “P.I.M.P.,” with appearances from Olivia (“Candy Shop”), Mobb Deep (“Outta Control (Remix)”) Justin Timberlake and Timbaland (“Ayo Technology”), Akon (“I’ll Still Kill”), and Ne-Yo (“Baby By Me”).

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: Hunger For More 2 Edition

hfm212Lloyd Baks-The Hunger For More 2

The G-Unit flag that waved so mightily in the 2000s was at half-staff by the end of the decade. 50 Cent's musical success and relevance was on a downslope, Young Buck and Game were ceremoniously removed from the picture, and Tony Yayo was, well, Tony Yayo. Which meant Lloyd Banks, G-Unit's silent assassin, was left in a discomforting position. The self-proclaimed Punchline King was reeling from a sophomore slump, as well as being dropped from Interscope. So his decision to title his third release as a sequel to his debut album felt more like a desperation move than a novelty nod to its predecessor.

If The Hunger for More was Banks' crowning solo achievement and Rotten Apple the result of lack of execution, H.F.M.2. was somewhere in between.