Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: ‘The Documentary’ Edition

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2.The Game-The Documentary

If 50 Cent's debut was a project propelled by a villain's charisma and the gulliest of origin stories, we must admit that Game, in contrast, was just riding the beats. With a soundscape dominated by Dr. Dre, Just Blaze, and Kanye West, The Documentary is a millennial blend of soul meta-samples, synth strings, tenor-sung hooks. This one tape alone hosts many of 2005's most memorable beats; the minimal, addictive synth cadence of "How We Do," the soul hypnosis of "Hate It Or Love It," and the godly stomps of "Higher."

The Documentary was everything a rap album could've been in 2005: a beatmaker dream team, one of the last great D'Angelo choruses, as well as Nate Dogg's last hurrah. (Plus, a Detox teaser). And while Dre receives all due props from Game, "No More Fun and Games" and "Church for Thugs" tally among the best work of Just Blaze's career.

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: ‘Straight Outta Ca$hville’ Edition

buckcahsville3. Young Buck-Straight Outta Ca$hville

"In the street, the consensus is that Buck's album is better than Banks's," said 50 Cent, in a 2005 interview with VIBE, about Young Buck and Lloyd Banks' debut albums. Yup, even the G-Unit general knew Young Buck had somehow usurped the Punchline King as the second best in the crew. Few knew what to make of Buck when he first started rolling with G-Unit. He made an appearance on "Blood Hound" off 50 Cent's Get Rich but it wasn't enough to establish him. He did that on the Unit's Beg For Mercy where he was able to step in and play as

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: ‘The Messacre’ Edition

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4. 50 Cent-The Messacre

In a lot of ways, 50 Cent's The Massacre is the beginning of the end for 50 Cent and G-Unit as a whole. It features all the missteps that would soon either undermine or undo 50's empire; a misguided pop effort that alienated too many core fans yet still resulted in a No. 1 hit ("Candy Shop"), an overzealous effort to use beef as a marketing ploy ("Piggy Bank"), and the use of commercial performance to justify all antics (selling 1.14 million copies in a short week). But what really undid this album is 50's hubris. Coming off Get Rich or Die Tryin' he was absolutely convinced that he'd never run out of hits because he could just go to the studio and whip up some more. So much so he essentially gave away the first draft of The Massacre to his then protege, The Game, for his debut, The Documentary.

Take a moment to consider how much better The Massacre would have been if you instead had the six songs 50 would later claim he wrote for Game, including "Hate It or Love It" and "How We Do."

And yet, 50 had all the reason in the world be confident. The Massacre still featured some of the best rap music of not just 50's career, but of that era of rap period. Yes, the album was overindulgent with a jampacked lineup of 22 tracks that ran 73 minutes. But it still featured songs like "In My Hood," "This Is 50," and "Ski Mask Way." The Vivica A. Fox diss on "Get In My Car"

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: ‘Beg For Mercy’ Edition

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5. G-Unit- Beg For Mercy

Beg For Mercy, as its title suggests, was G-Unit's twisting the bayonet. 50 had just overwhelmed the rap game as a solo artist, and he had opened the door for his right- and left-hand men. Given the degree of 50's success (Get Rich Or Die Tryin' had been released nine months prior), the trio could have phoned this one in and had no problem with sales. What resulted was a very well-executed group aesthetic with a gang of classic songs, maybe even a classic album. 50 was rapping with the relaxed composure of someone who knew he had the game in his palm, while Banks and Buck came with the hunger.

The formula for a Beg For Mercy song was to take one of many perfect beats (the whole album was sonically reminiscent of The Chronic: 2001 to me, with a crispness that Dre had perfected just a couple years prior, despite

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: ‘Buck The World’ Edition

bucktheworldalbum6. Young Buck-Buck The World

Even before the infamous taped conversation, Young Buck developed a reputation as the most emotional member of G-Unit. But emotion isn’t a bad thing for an artist—just ask Drake. On his sophomore album, Buck The World, the Nashville native tapped into the full spectrum of feelings without ever once wavering from the G-Unit model of gangsta rap. This was the case with

Ranking G-Unit’s Albums From Worst To Best: The Hunger For More Edition

bankshunger17.Lloyd Banks-The Hunger The More

Those of us who were recruited to G-Unit's fanbase via their earliest mixtape grind had to have been wondering what would come of Banks and Yayo. With the eventual recruitment of UTP's Young Buck and Dr. Dre's protege Game,

G-Unit was suddenly a crowded roster. Banks got the first solo release date following 50 Cent's debut.

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